who we are

NW3C provides a nationwide support system for law enforcement and regulatory agencies tasked with the prevention, investigation and prosecution of economic and high-tech crime.

We deliver training in computer forensics, cyber and financial crime investigations and intelligence analysis. We offer analytical technical support to agencies investigating and prosecuting white collar and related crimes. We conduct original research on all facets of white collar crime.
 


what we do

Online Training

Omni-Platform Support
devices
Your Time, Your Pace
 

Access NW3C’s growing library of online training
on relevant topics like virtual currency,
encryption, and the dark web.



 

A New Standard
line

 
NW3C
Certifications

For over 40 years, NW3C’s comprehensive training programs have helped law enforcement professionals master the principles, concepts, and skills they need to fight cyber and economic crime. Our newest initiative offers law enforcement and the private sector the opportunity to earn professional certifications. NW3C certifications, backed by our industry-leading expertise and reputation, attest to demonstrated competence in digital forensics and/or the investigation of illegal financial activity.
 
Certified Economic Crime
Forensic Examiner
(CECFE)
Available for professionals in both law enforcement and the private sector, this certification attests to the holder’s ability to investigate and analyze information related to financial misconduct of all types. Holders of this certification have demonstrated that they possess the working knowledge and skills needed to detect, respond to, and investigate illegal financial activity.
Certified Cyber Crime
Examiner
(CCCE)
Available for professionals in both law enforcement and the private sector, this certification attests to the holder’s knowledge of proper digital forensic techniques and best practices for working with digital evidence. Holders of this certification have demonstrated their knowledge of the identification and proper handling of digital evidence; types of digital hardware technologies; common filesystems; best practices in forensic imaging; documenting and reporting; and legal considerations.